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BHP runs away

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  #1  
Old 6th November 2018, 04:59
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BHP runs away

G'day,
OZZI OZZI OZZI OI OI OI.
No, not our cricket chant.
We have managed to do it again.
UNSTOPPABLE.
Yesterday, a BHP ore train MO2712 comprising 4 locos and 268 wagons RAN AWAY.
It rolled for 92 kms before being remotely derailed by train control.
The derailment occurring about 119 kms south of Port Hedland WA.
Apparently, the driver had jumped off to inspect a problem.
DOO (driver only operation).
And, whilst on the ground, his train departed with out him.
RO-2018-018 being the ATSB investigation now commenced.
The derailment has created a mess, apparently.
Yet another incident report that I will eagerly await publication.
I am reminded of the Pilbara ore trains some years ago.
When ever required to halt for any period, ore wagon hand brakes had to be applied to hold the train stationary.
The locomotive brakes not being sufficient to hold the train stationary for any period.
I don't possess a grade profile for the BHP Pilbara operation.
But, would imagine that it would be generally down hill heading north to Port Hedland.
Steve.


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Old 6th November 2018, 14:06
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Beeyar Wunby Beeyar Wunby is offline  
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Hi Steve.

Interesting.

Our latest batch of utterly driver-proof trains have a fault whereby they can just sail off into the sunset at full power without the driver, if she/he goes back down the train to clear a fault without securing the cab. I'm just waiting for the day that happens, whilst being extremely careful myself (hopefully).

Best wishes, BW.

Last edited by Beeyar Wunby; 6th November 2018 at 18:36.
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Old 6th November 2018, 14:15
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More info and short video.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-...-site/10469802
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Old 6th November 2018, 16:37
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This story is interesting to me because my late brother worked at Mount Newman for a while after university.
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Old 7th November 2018, 03:16
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G'day BW and Philip,
Yes, the Westinghouse air brake was a marvelous invention back in the 1880s.
But, it does have limitations.
Nothing is air tight, and air can eventually leak off.
BW, surely yer newbie emu sets have Spring Parker brakes ?
Securing an old smog hollow red rattler against movement was a challenge.
But, modern day smog hollow emu sets have spring parkers that apply through out the train.
With the A7EL and B7EL brake valves here on older weasels and electric locos, you could not rely on a train brake application to keep the train stationary for any long period.
That being IF the loco brakes were insufficient to hold the train stationary.
Sufficient hand brakes had to be applied to the train.
But, the self maintaining feature of the 26L brake valve, we could rely on the train brake application.
Supposedly.
But, create any sudden back pressure in the train brake pipe, and them brakes can release.
But, I can tell you from personal experience, being underneath a wagon attempting to rectify an air brake problem is NOT fun under any circumstances.
When you find that part of the brake rigging has collapsed into the four foot.
Especially where you are BY YERSELF (DOO), in the dark, and that train is standing on a steep grade.
And, the weasel brake valve is the Davies Metcalfe M9A.
You are constantly wondering if the brakes will hold.
Nothing is perfect.
But, I did survive intact that nite.
Steve.
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Old 7th November 2018, 16:58
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Yo Steve.

Yes all modern Multiple Units built since the 1960s have auto-parking brakes. (As I'm sure you know) usually on each driving motor car there is an extra cylinder at the back of the brake cylinder which has a piston and a spring. This is fed from the brake reservoir, such that when working pressure is available the piston holds the spring back. But if the reservoir empties and there is no air available for the brake, the spring pushes forward onto the brake mechanism and moves the disc pad onto the wheel or axle, depending on the mechanics of the brake. This is not terribly strong - about the equivalent of a 'step one' brake application, but is enough to hold a train on a gradient, or bring it to a stand eventually.

The APB is a really great addition, because if a train is stabled unattended and the juice goes off for any reason (which it does regularly overnight round here), the compressor won't work and the train will slowly lose its air. As it does so the parking brake brake will apply and the train stays where it is. Better stilll, as the first driver of the day finds that all the trains in the yard have shut down, he'll be running around getting them to 'pump up'. As the air pressure on-board starts to rise and the main brakes start to apply again, the parking brakes will take themselves off. It all happens silently and out of sight, but prevents the embarrassment and danger of having trains running away on their own.

God bless the brake fairies.

Hope this makes sense.

Cheers, BW.
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Old 8th November 2018, 07:34
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G'day BW,
Loco wise here in NSW, 1981 for the implementation of the spring parker.
EMU wise, 1979 (though I might be slightly wrong there, it may have been 1978).
Prior to that, either ratchet (HA don't tempt me) or wheel type crank chain link to a single or two wheels brake cylinders.
Our first loco spring parkers had individual bogie application handles or push buttons in the cab.
You had to go sprinting through to the other cab to apply the second bogie spring parker.
The 82 class things provided train lined spring parker application.
The C (chopper) set emu had manual handle application for each car, but the subsequent Tangarbage had train lined application.
The BHP Pilbara ore trains have ECP (electrically controlled pneumatic) type air brake in conjunction with standard Westinghouse.
ECP won't stop a train that breaks apart en route.
Hamersley Iron went to EPIC style electronic in the cab Westinghouse in the mid 1990s.
That caused some dramas initially with the software and caused numerous emergency applications.
We will just hafta wait and see what transpired with this recent run-away.
Oh, and Philip, I have uploaded a photo of Mount Newman Mining locos at Port Hedland taken in 1989 into the gallery.
https://www.railwayforum.net/gallery..._for_forum.jpg
Steve.
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Old 8th November 2018, 09:12
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Morning Steve, on the good old BBC News Channel at midnight we have Newsday, the event was mentioned on it including some overhead footage of the train derailed.
Somebody's going to be busy clearing up for a while!!!

Cheers John
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Old 8th November 2018, 13:29
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Hi Steve, you mentioned 'Unstoppable' in your opening post - you mean the Denzel Washington movie of that name? When I first saw the report of this runaway, that's exactly what occurred to me - that Aussie train was reliving the movie. It's almost identical! Weird.

Stay safe yourself
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Old 8th November 2018, 17:32
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And the Guardian has done a piece (Link...https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/video/2018/nov/07/footage-shows-two-kilometre-bhp-train-crash-in-outback-australia-video )

They say that the cost is "likely to run into tens of millions".

So possibly NO Christmas bonus this year then guys.

BW
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