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Early Trams in Nice

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  #1  
Old 28th December 2018, 21:40
RogerFarnworth RogerFarnworth is offline  
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Early Trams in Nice

As part of my birthday present this year my wife gave two books written in French about the Trams of Nice. I am enjoying working out what the books say! This post relates to the relatively unusual practice of regular transport of goods on a tram network, which was common practice in Nice.

https://rogerfarnworth.wordpress.com...de-provence-60


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Old 28th December 2018, 21:41
RogerFarnworth RogerFarnworth is offline  
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The TNL in Nice grew in size in the years before the first world war but had great difficulty in getting new lines authorised and built

https://rogerfarnworth.wordpress.com...de-provence-62

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This post focusses on the years immediately before the First World War. It was at this time that the network reached its fullest extent and it was the time when it was both in its best condition and carrying the greatest number of passengers. After the First World War things began to change and competition from other forms of transport increased.
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Old 28th December 2018, 21:43
RogerFarnworth RogerFarnworth is offline  
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Currently I am reading a book written in French about the tramways of Nice and the Cote d'Azur written by Jose Banuado. Sadly the book is only available in French. I have to use an internet based translation package to understand the book as my French is very limited.

This post is based on Jose Banuado's book and covers the period of the First World War.

http://rogerfarnworth.com/2018/08/28...de-provence-80
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Old 28th December 2018, 21:46
RogerFarnworth RogerFarnworth is offline  
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This next post reflects on the conditions on the tramway network in Nice in the years after the war:

http://rogerfarnworth.com/2018/12/28...de-provence-83
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Old 16th April 2019, 15:37
RogerFarnworth RogerFarnworth is offline  
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It was not long before the tramways around Nice began an inexorable decline. The early 1930s saw the loss of many of the tram routes outside the city of Nice. Buses were the new thing as far as public transport was concerned. The car became gradually more important.

http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/04/09...de-provence-84
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Old 14th October 2019, 18:17
RogerFarnworth RogerFarnworth is offline  
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Further decline in the urban tramway network in Nice occurred from the late 1920s into the 1930s. Buses became politically more acceptable than the trams. ... This post continues my reflections based on a translation of the work of Jose Banaudo from French into English. ...

http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/10/14...de-provence-86

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A Changing Urban Network in/around Nice

The 1930s through to the 1950s saw major changes in the urban environment. As elsewhere, the car began to dominate people understanding of progress. Other firms of transport, to a greater or lesser extent, took a secondary place. Independence, rather than interdependence, came to dominate political thinking. Strengthening democracy after the Second World War valued the perspective of the individual. By the end of the 1950s the place if the 'expert' in any debate was beginning to be challenged. No longer were people as willing to be told what was best for them. In a significant way, the car became a touchstone for that growing independence and self-confidence. The tram and the train began to be seen as part of the past rather than an important part of the future.
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