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Mystery Object any ideas?

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  #1  
Old 16th April 2019, 21:10
Electric dreams Electric dreams is offline  
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Mystery Object any ideas?

Hi all, first thread here and a test for all those experts. I just bought this control panel from an auction without viewing it first as it was so far away. I thought it might have had some identifying marks on it but it doesn't. Does anyone have any idea what it might have come out of? Presumably an electric engine. I've no idea how old but must be at least 20years old. Look forward to your thoughts and suggestions!
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  #2  
Old 19th April 2019, 20:39
ianrail ianrail is offline  
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It will be interesting to see if this new member ever logs in again or turns out to be another one post wonder, which we are seeing quite a lot recently.
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Old 20th April 2019, 12:18
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Beeyar Wunby Beeyar Wunby is offline  
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Well whether the OP returns or not, I fancy having a dibble - purely for the sake of interest or stimulating a discussion amongst the rest of us.
So here are some observations & guestimates...

1) Those lumps look like the coloured lenses of an annunciator/indicator panel, rather than a 'control panel'. The photo doesn't give much away. In my travels I've come across these sort things on 1970 stock, ie class 313 and 317. 1980's traction has much more up to date indicators and switches. So this thing is more like 50 years old than 20.

2) Because of the number of indicators I'm guessing that this is from a loco rather than a multiple unit, though again, I could be wrong. Also there are 4 blowers for traction motors. So it probably has beefy traction motors - another trait of a loco.

3) There are indicators for Transformer Aux & Alarm, so I believe this is from an AC Electric Traction unit. I could be wrong, because all units must provide ac for auxiliaries, but if it were Diesel or DC there should be references to an Inverter or Motor Alternator to produce the AC which would go to the transformer, so that's my guess.

4) There is an indicator for Train Heat, so this thing has the capability to haul passenger stock.

So put that all together, and I'd be looking for an Electric AC loco with passenger stock capability from the 1970's or earlier.

If I were a betting man - Class 86 or 87 maybe ? Could be something earlier still ?

Our friend Aussisteve has driven electric locos, so probably can shed some light. I believe he's camping at the moment without access to the Interweb, but maybe when he returns he can add something.

Hope this makes sense, BW
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Last edited by Beeyar Wunby; 20th April 2019 at 12:23.
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Old 23rd April 2019, 12:05
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Master Cutler Master Cutler is offline  
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Due to the absence of an oil pressure warning lamp to indicate "Engine Stopped" I agree that this is a warning lamp panel from an electric locomotive of some sort.
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Old 24th April 2019, 10:30
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Colin J.Marsden has a selection of cab photos here:http://www.dawlishtrains.com/the-driving-cab.html
I can't see the OP's panel in any of the photos but I could easily have missed it.
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Old 24th April 2019, 16:41
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Beeyar Wunby Beeyar Wunby is offline  
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Originally Posted by swisstrains View Post
Colin J.Marsden has a selection of cab photos here:http://www.dawlishtrains.com/the-driving-cab.html
I can't see the OP's panel in any of the photos but I could easily have missed it.
It's possible that the indicator panel is in the engine/equipment room ? It looks a bit big to be on the driver's desk.

Nice link, by the way.

Cheers, BW
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Old 28th April 2019, 02:52
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aussiesteve aussiesteve is offline
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G'day,
I'm back (as Chuckie did say).
I've taken a quick squiz at the image, but it appears too small on me Chromebook.
I have saved it and will attempt to enlarge it on me main computer.
Crikey, are there some impressive cab shots in that Dawlish trains web site.
I'll definitely hafta trawl around in there when next I visit the local library.
Steve.
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Old 28th April 2019, 07:40
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aussiesteve aussiesteve is offline
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G'day again,
I have blown up the image of the indicator panel with me Photoshop and can now read the various alarm tabs.
I kinda agree with BW and Master that this seems to be a panel from an older electric loco.
A Bo-Bo type with four traction motors.
It is interesting that individual alarms are provided for each traction motor Overloads.
I am baffled by the surge suppression alarm.
This seems to suggest that the main transformer can suffer from surging output.
So, potentially a vintage AC supply with DC traction electric loco.
My only exposure to electric locos being the trio of our NSWR 1500 volt DC classes.
All of which were Co-Co wheel arrangement and 6 traction motors.
The butter box Metro Vickers 46 class had motor generators, and the 85 & 86 class Mitsubishis had motor alternators to produce auxiliary current.
The 85 & 86 class possessing fluro cab lighting and cab aircon.
The 46 class provided a traction motor cut-out switch to isolate a pair of motors if suffering an earth fault.
The butter boxes possessing notching relays via resistance banks, and the 85 / 86 class possessing pilot motor driven notching camshafts via resistance banks.
I am not familiar with AC electric locos.
Though, I do know that older German AC supply DC traction electrics featured a transformer.
The multi-tap transformer providing increasing or decreasing DC traction voltage in accordance with controller notch.
I am also aware that a slight voltage phase shift can occur in between adjoining DB substation supply sections.
Hence a neutral zone through which the loco/s must coast separates adjoining substation supply sections.
The loco master switch being turned off for this neutral zone.
I can only assume this prevents any damage sustained to high tension equipment if encountering the sudden phase shift in supply.
The USA plus some European countries trialed Bi-polar electric locos early on.
I have no idea just how they functioned.
As to the dimensions of this fault indicator panel, if such were known that might suggest where this panel was located.
However, knowing the size of the fault panel in the cab of a Tassie X class EE weasel, this panel could easily be located in the cab.
The fault lamps on the desk of a butter box 46 class were originally large in size.
Such being reduced in size as smaller lamps became available in later operational life.
It is a shame that no cab switches are included with this panel.
That would possibly identify the origin of the loco.
Our butter boxes, being Pommy had switches placed down for ON and up for OFF.
All other motive power here having the Yankee switch alignment; UP for ON and DOWN for OFF.
The other question, was all BR coaching stock converted over to electric heating after the demise of soot belchers ?
Or, did specific coaching stock get assigned to electric traction haulage ?
Did any Pommy weasels possess steam boilers for train heating ?
I know that early Yankee weasels possessed steam boilers to supply train heating.
And, I am fairly certain that the GG1 electric locos also possessed a steam boiler for train heating.
The pair of unidentified fault lamps at the bottom of the panel make me wonder.
There being no mention of wheel slip or line volt faults.
Anyhoo, I shall vote for a vintage electric loco.
Steve.
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Old 18th June 2020, 12:52
Railman158 Railman158 is offline  
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Originally Posted by ianrail View Post
It will be interesting to see if this new member ever logs in again or turns out to be another one post wonder, which we are seeing quite a lot recently.
A bit shallow of you to remark in such a way?
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Old 30th June 2020, 20:31
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Dawnrider Dawnrider is offline  
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A bit shallow of you to remark in such a way?
And yet it seems he was right. The OP has only made this one single post
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