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Driver Wallace Oakes GC

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  #1  
Old 8th August 2013, 18:42
ShaolinMonkey ShaolinMonkey is offline
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Driver Wallace Oakes GC

Hi all,

I'm new here and i'm on a mission. I know nothing about trains, so please excuse my ignorance.

My mission, to track down Diesel Electric Locomotive 86260 or rather its old name plates. I don't know how well known this is , but this loco was named "Driver Wallace Oakes GC" after Wallace Oakes who died in service saving passengers lives.

What I know, or rather think, is that its name and number were changed in 2009 to "Cassiopeia 86702". So my questions are where is this loco now? what would they have done with its old name plates? and what would be the chances of getting hold of one?
My reason for doing this is my father-in-law is an Oakes and i recently found out that Wallace was his great uncle.

So as i said, i know nothing about trains, so i have no idea if this is even possible, or where to go to find out. I thank you all in advance for any help or info you can give me.


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Old 8th August 2013, 20:15
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DSY011 DSY011 is offline  
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Hello ShaolinMonkey and welcome to the Railway Forum.

I found this info on http://www.railblue.com/Fleet/class_86_fleet.htm

E3144 86048, 86260 Driver Wallace Oakes GC Locomotive still extant as at 11.07

There is nothing about "Cassiopeia 86702".

There is a photo of the name plate at

http://www.railblue.com/pages/Class%..._nameplate.htm
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  #3  
Old 8th August 2013, 20:42
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pre65 pre65 is online now  
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This Wikipedia article is a bit confusing () but it suggests the class 86 named "Cassiopeia" is stored at Barrow Hill.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_Class_86

I can't remember the name of the preservation group for mainline electric locos, but there might be more details on their web site ?
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Old 9th August 2013, 13:15
talky-tim talky-tim is offline  
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I just googled 86702 and found that a guy with a "Flickr" photo account has a beautiful shot of it (cannot copy due to copyright issues). It is in barrowhill yard and is dated 5th july 2013. It also has the nameplates "cassiopiea" on the sides. Definately worth going to the site. The photographer is called Martin Arrand or (martin65). Don't know anything about the older nameplates unfortunately, cheers, Tim
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Old 9th August 2013, 14:22
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Photos of "it" with the nameplates on.

http://railwayherald.com/imagingcentre/view/288590/LC

http://railwayherald.com/imagingcentre/view/120700/LC

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tutenkh...ng/6287897725/

http://www.carlscam.com/people/oakes.htm

A bit about the Man

Wallace Arnold Oakes

Wallace Arnold Oakes, born on 23 April 1932, was a Driver with British Rail.

Driver Oakes left Crewe driving the steam locomotive of a relief passenger train. The train consisted of ten coaches and was reasonably well filled with passengers.

When about seven miles from Crewe, travelling at nearly sixty miles per hour, the engine cab was suddenly filled with smoke and flames blowing back from the firebox. The fireman at once climbed through the side windows and somehow managed to get on the cab steps where he extinguished his burning clothing by rubbing himself against the plating. He could not see into the cab but, realising the brake had been applied, he remained on the steps until the train stopped.

The flames subsided at once and he re-entered the cab to find that Oakes was missing; he saw him lying on the cutting slope just ahead of the cab. His clothing was severely burnt and the flesh beneath had suffered similarly to tin extent described later as 80 per cent of his body. Oakes was, however, still able to speak at that stage but was dazed. The first person to make an inspection of the controls was a fireman from an up train which was stopped to pick up the injured man. He found the brake fully applied, the regulator partly open and the blower valve open.

It seems apparent, therefore, that Driver Oakes, instead of quitting the cab as soon as the blow-back occurred remained to apply the brake, open the blower, and probably close the regulator partly. The position in which he was found shows that he did not leave the engine until it had come to rest. Mr. Oakes must have been aware that to remain at the controls of the locomotive was a grave risk to his own life. Nevertheless, he applied the brakes fully and took all the measures he could to reduce the effects of the blow-back.

Driver Oakes' gallant action showed that his first thought was for the safety of his passengers.

Oakes' injuries were so severe that he had to be suspended over his hospital bed, as he was unable to lie down. He was given regular and large doses of morphia to alleviate the agony of his injuries. A week after the accident, on 12 June 1965, Wallace Arnold Oakes died in Manchester's Wythenshawe Hospital.

During 1966, Driver Oakes was also awarded the Bronze Medal of the Carnegie Hero Trust. The citation for this award reads as follows:

Wallace A. Oakes (33), locomotive Driver, 6 Sandy Lane, Wheelock Heath, Sandbatch, Cheshire, on 5 June 1965, although severely burned by a blow-back from the fire-box in the express train he was driving, brought the train to a stop at Winsford, Chesire, and ensured the safety of a large number of passengers; he died as a result of his injuries on 12 June 1965.

On 19 February 1981 at London's Euston Rail Station, an electric locomotive no. 86260 was named "Driver Wallace Oakes GC".
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Last edited by pre65; 9th August 2013 at 14:44.
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Old 9th August 2013, 15:18
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Touching story Philip. Must be a proud relative ShaolinMonkey. Looks like you have your answers, and by the way a warm welcome to the forum too.
All the best
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Old 12th August 2013, 20:43
ShaolinMonkey ShaolinMonkey is offline
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Hi all,

Thanks for your help so far. I've sent an e-mail to Barrow Hill, i'll let you know how i get on

cheers
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  #8  
Old 1st February 2018, 21:16
SMITHY SW SMITHY SW is offline  
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Driver Wallace Oakes G C

Just seen on Northwest Tonight,dedicating a headstone to his grave .It was said he was in a unmarked grave.
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Old 1st February 2018, 23:55
bramleyman bramleyman is offline  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SMITHY SW View Post
Just seen on Northwest Tonight,dedicating a headstone to his grave .It was said he was in a unmarked grave.
Well deserved too.
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Old 3rd February 2018, 07:19
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Interesting thread. Could someone explain a little more about blowbacks ? I've heard the phrase used before, but never really known what was involved. Sounds pretty scary.

Eg; were they predictable, or preventable ? Or did they just come 'out of the blue' ?

BW
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