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  #1  
Old 21st April 2010, 18:59
WhiteRose WhiteRose is offline  
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Class 66 cab doors

This is just to satisfy my curiosity. Why are the cab doors set so far back from the side windows on a class 66? Have they lots of space inside the cab?

Cheers

Richard


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  #2  
Old 21st April 2010, 22:12
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HM181 HM181 is offline
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The cab on a 66 is has space in it for 2 members of crew with ease.
If you ever see an open cab door you will see the when it was painted the door was closed, as you can see a border of unpainted metal round the outside of the door.
The seats are ok and will recline to some extent, this comes in handy on ballast turns,as you can have a sleep whilst doing nowt.
In the warm weather the cabs heat up and become too warm for the drivers.
ASLEF gave EWS an ultimatum to fit AC's in both cabs or class 66's would be blacked.
EWS maintained the if AC's were fitted in the class 66 it would take it over its Route Availability with the excess weight.

When 66 first came into service, when you were hooking off between the buffers, the engine would rev up as though it was going to move.

Last edited by HM181; 21st April 2010 at 22:16.
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  #3  
Old 22nd April 2010, 11:19
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When 66 first came into service, when you were hooking off between the buffers, the engine would rev up as though it was going to move.[/QUOTE]

And still do as this part of the design, put simply if the computer detects a drop in the air system then it tells the compressors to speed up to compensate.

Les
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  #4  
Old 22nd April 2010, 17:00
WhiteRose WhiteRose is offline  
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Interesting stuff. Thanks to both of you for taking the time to respond.

Cheers

Richard
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  #5  
Old 22nd April 2010, 19:45
Seabrook Seabrook is offline  
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When you open the External Doors on a Class 66 you enter a small passageway and the Cab doors are on the back wall of the Cab. 2 Doors No'1 end and 1 Door No'2 End. This reduces draughts and noise due to the cab doors also being sound insulated. The external doors are just formed sheets of steel. No'1 cab is large and spacious. No'2 end cab is a lot smaller and suffers from noise and severe overheating in Summer due to being situated in front of the radiators and cooling fans.
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  #6  
Old 8th January 2011, 22:41
Gwilicivils Gwilicivils is offline  
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66 doors eat fingures.
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  #7  
Old 9th January 2011, 12:34
Seabrook Seabrook is offline  
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When we as Drivers were finally issued gloves on a regular basis one of the reasons stated was because of the rough grips on the handrails. One supervisor also added the rider 'if your fingers are ever caught in the doors he expected to see blood inside them'. Such was the reputation Class 66s had for trapping fingers. What might seem a tongue in cheek comment left me unsure owing to the legendary tightness of our FOC who did not want to face a claim!
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Old 9th January 2011, 15:14
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My experience of 66 doors is that they could not be opened from the ground using the bottom door handle so basically you would have to climb the steps and get level with the door, twist the handle and apply a firm bit of protective footwear to the bottom of the door. On reflection, they are probably no different from any other loco. 67 doors don't line up with the steps and are therefore more challenging.
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  #9  
Old 19th January 2011, 03:58
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Interesting read guys......
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  #10  
Old 19th January 2011, 22:25
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Wakey spotter Wakey spotter is offline  
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HM181. Regarding the "Self" revving up of the Class66 :- When National Power Rail Business became a part of the then EWS I remember the first time I took a EWS 66 out. The Lad that was with me who had plenty of experience of Driving Class 59/2 ( which don`t self rev) was inbetween coupling up to some wagons when Mr 66 decided to Rev up on its own !! I have never seen anyone dive out from between a loco and wagons like that !! Gordon Banks / Peter Schmiechael would have been jealous !! lol
His choice of words after that towards me were a not quite nice !! lol
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